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Beauty and the Beast(Practice AIR Test)

In this excerpt from “Beauty and the Beast,” the Beast allows his captive Beauty to visit her family for a short while. After staying with her family past the time limit, Beauty returns to find the castle and its grounds empty.

 

Beauty and the Beast

edited by Andrew Lang

 

1  So everything went on for a long time, until at last, happy as she was, Beauty began to long for the sight of her father and her brothers and sisters; and one night, seeing her look very sad, the Beast asked her what was the matter. Beauty had quite ceased to be afraid of him. Now she knew that he was really gentle in spite of his ferocious looks and his dreadful voice. So she answered that she was longing to see her home once more. Upon hearing this the Beast seemed sadly distressed, and cried miserably.

2  “Ah! Beauty, have you the heart to desert an unhappy Beast like this? What more do you want to make you happy? Is it because you hate me that you want to escape?”

3 “No, dear Beast,” answered Beauty softly, “I do not hate you, and I should be very sorry never to see you anymore, but I long to see my father again. Only let me go for two months, and I promise to come back to you and stay for the rest of my life.”

4 The Beast, who had been sighing dolefully while she spoke, now replied:

5 “I cannot refuse you anything you ask, even though it should cost me my life. Take the four boxes you will find in the room next to your own, and fill them with everything you wish to take with you. But remember your promise and come back when the two months are over, or you may have cause to repent it, for if you do not come in good time you will find your faithful Beast dead. You will not need any chariot to bring you back. Only say good-bye to all your brothers and sisters the night before you come away, and when you have gone to bed turn this ring round upon your finger and say firmly: ‘I wish to go back to my palace and see my Beast again.’ Good-night, Beauty. Fear nothing, sleep peacefully, and before long you shall see your father once more.” …….

 

       . . .

 

6 Then her sisters seemed to have got quite used to being without her, and even found her rather in the way, so she would not have been sorry when the two months were over but for her father and brothers, who begged her to stay, and seemed so grieved at the thought of her departure that she had not the courage to say goodbye to them. Every day when she got up she meant to say it at night, and when night came she put it off again, until at last she had a dismal dream which helped her to make up her mind       . . .

7 Beauty was so terrified by this dream that the next morning she announced her intention of going back at once, and that very night she said good-bye to her father and all her brothers and sisters, and as soon as she was in bed she turned her ring round upon her finger, and said firmly, “I wish to go back to my palace and see my Beast again,” as she had been told to do.

 

8Then she fell asleep instantly, and only woke up to hear the clock saying “Beauty, Beauty” twelve times in its musical voice, which told her at once that she was really in the palace once more. Everything was just as before, and her birds were so glad to see her! But Beauty thought she had never known such a long day, for she was so anxious to see the Beast again that she felt as if suppertime would never come.

 

9 But when it did come and no Beast appeared she was really frightened; so, after listening and waiting for a long time, she ran down into the garden to search for him.

 

10 Up and down the paths and avenues ran poor Beauty, calling him in vain, for no one answered, and not a trace of him could she find; until at last, quite tired, she stopped for a minute’s rest, and saw that she was standing opposite the shady path she had seen in her dream. She rushed down it, and, sure enough, there was the cave, and in it lay the Beast—asleep, as Beauty thought. Quite glad to have found him, she ran up and stroked his head, but, to her horror, he did not move or open his eyes.

 

11 “Oh! he is dead; and it is all my fault,” said Beauty, crying bitterly.

 

 

12 But then, looking at him again, she fancied he still breathed, and, hastily fetching some water from the nearest fountain, she sprinkled it over his face, and, to her great delight, he began to revive.

13 “Oh! Beast, how you frightened me!” she cried. “I never knew how much I loved you until just now, when I feared I was too late to save your life.”

14 “Can you really love such an ugly creature as I am?” said the Beast faintly. “Ah! Beauty, you only came just in time. I was dying because I thought you had forgotten your promise. But go back now and rest, I shall see you again by and by.”

15 Beauty, who had half expected that he would be angry with her, was reassured by his gentle voice, and went back to the palace, where supper was awaiting her; and afterward the Beast came in as usual, and talked about the time she had spent with her father, asking if she had enjoyed herself, and if they had all been very glad to see her.

16 Beauty answered politely, and quite enjoyed telling him all that had happened to her. And when at last the time came for him to go, and he asked, as he had so often asked before, “Beauty, will you marry me?”

17 She answered softly, “Yes, dear Beast.”

18 As she spoke a blaze of light sprang up before the windows of the palace; fireworks crackled . . . , and across the avenue of orange trees, in letters all made of fire-flies, was written: “Long live the Prince and his Bride.”

19 Turning to ask the Beast what it could all mean, Beauty found that he had disappeared, and in his place stood her long-loved Prince!

 

Excerpt from “Beauty and the Beast” from TheBlue Fairy Book, edited by Andrew Lang. In the public domain.





 

  1. This question has 2 parts. First, answer Part A. Then, answer Part B.

 

Part A

Based on the context of Paragraph 10, what is the meaning what is the meaning of the phrase calling him in vain?

  1. Calling loudly

  2. Calling self-centeredly

  3. Calling soft spoken

  4. Calling unsuccessfully

 

Part B

Underline the phrase that supports the meaning selected in Part A.

10 Up and down the paths and avenues ran poor Beauty, calling him in vain, for no one answered, and not a trace of him could she find; until at last, quite tired, she stopped for a minute’s rest, and saw that she was standing opposite the shady path she had seen in her dream.

2. Select two quotations from the passage that show that the beast acted courteously towards Beauty.

  • (10) “Up and down the paths and avenues ran poor Beauty, calling him in vain, for no one answered, and not a trace of him could she find.”

  • (13) “I never knew how much I loved you until just now, when I feared I was too late to save your life.”

  • (14) “I was dying because I thought you had forgotten your promise.”

  • (14) “But go back now and rest, I shall see you again by and by.”

  • (15) “....and afterward the Beast came in as usual, and talked about the time she had spent with her father, asking if she had enjoyed herself, and if they had all been very glad to see her.”

  • (19) “Turning to ask the Beast what it could all mean, Beauty found that he had disappeared, and in his place stood her long-loved Prince!”

 

3. How does paragraph 19 contribute to the overall passage?

  1. It shows the results of Beauty’s true love.

  2. It reverses one of Beauty's earlier decisions.

  3. It builds mystery about where the Beast goes.

  4. It introduces a character to compete with the Beast.

4. How are the phrases “reassured by his gentle voice” and ‘came in as usual” important in paragraph 15.

  1. They suggest the Beast’s attempt to deceive Beauty.

  2. They emphasize Beauty’s feelings of isolation in the palace.

  3. They introduce the Beast’s point of view for the first time.

  4. They develop a sense of routine in the relationship between Beauty and the Beast.

5. Why is Beauty’s encounter with Beast in the cave significant?

  1. She remembers to be fearful of the Beast.

  2. She realizes the Beast will die without her.

  3. She realizes how much she loves the Beast.

  4. She understands how bad captivity is for the Beast.

6. Read Paragraph 18.

18 As she spoke a blaze of light sprang up before the windows of the palace; fireworks crackled . . . , and across the avenue of orange trees, in letters all made of fire-flies, was written: “Long live the Prince and his Bride.”

How does this paragraph contribute to the development of the setting?

  1. By showing it is thrilling and elaborate.

  2. By showing it is vast and unpopulated.

  3. By showing it is a dangerous location.

  4. By showing it is a stage like a play.

 

7. This question has 2 parts. First, answer Part A. Then, answer Part B.

Part A

What is the theme of the passage?

  1. It is comforting to be welcomed.

  2. It can be difficult to adjust to change.

  3. Love helps people look past appearances.

  4. Unhappiness can be caused by people putting off decisions.

Part B

Which detail from the passage develops the theme in Part A?

  1. “Now she knew that he was really gentle in spite of his ferocious looks and his dreadful voice.” (paragraph 1)

  2. “Then her sisters seemed to have got quite used to being without her, and even found her rather in the way...” (paragraph 6)

  3. “Every day when she got up she meant to say it at night, and when night came she put it off again..” (paragraph 6)

  4. “Everything was just as before, and her birds were so glad to see her!” (paragraph 8)

 

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